Revamp will see Dundee complex one of the top cinemas in the country

The Odeon cinema.
The Odeon cinema.

A mulitplex cinema in Dundee is set to undergo a dramatic renovation to make it one of the best in the country – with the operator pledging to stay in the city until at least 2035.

Planning documents submitted to Dundee City Council appear to hint that cinema chain Odeon has big plans for its branch in Douglas.

According to the papers, the chain plans to upgrade the multiplex to become one of its Odeon Luxe cinemas, which offer better seating and more advanced screening technology for film buffs.

The blueprints show a proposal to replace the existing Odeon signage with the Odeon Luxe logo, all-but-confirming the cinema chain’s plans.

There are just 18 Odeon Luxe cinemas in the UK, three of which are in Scotland.


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The first opened in East Kilbride in 2017, offering reclining seats, 4K projection and an expanded food menu.

Odeon’s website promises: “With less seats and more personal space, you’ll have a more immersive experience with every visit”.

The chain has been contacted for comment on the plans. However, it is understood that the renovation is going ahead after building owner Regional REIT secured a 10-year lease extension with Odeon.

The cinema operator has agreed to lease and run the Dundee site until at least 2035 – at a cost of £737,600 a year.

However, Regional REIT has said it will contribute a “significant” amount of money towards the Luxe revamp.

First opened in 2000 at a cost of £5 million, the Douglasfield Odeon was at the centre of an action movie spectacle of its own in 2005 when cinemagoers were rapidly evacuated.

The multiplex was closed for weeks after a critical structural problem was identified, forcing films to be cancelled and audiences to be sent home mid-screening.

It is Odeon’s only Dundee branch after its other city multiplex, at The Stack Leisure Park, closed in 2001.

Urban explorers still venture into the building, which has remained largely intact since its closure, despite police warnings that it may contain asbestos.

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