What the papers say – February 10

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The start of the Winter Olympics in South Korea and the capture of so-called Islamic State fighters dubbed the ‘Beatles’ are making the headlines in Saturday’s papers.

The front page of the Times is devoted to the paper’s investigation into Oxfam for the second day in a row. The paper claims the charity “failed to warn aid agencies” about staff caught using prostitutes in Haiti.

The Daily Telegraph has an interview with Tobias Ellwood in which he said it would be wrong to send Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh – members of the so-called ‘Beatles’ – to Guantanamo Bay, adding they should be tried at the Hague.

The Guardian leads with a story claiming laboratory staff have been exposed to potentially lethal diseases after safety breaches.

Brexit leads the Financial Times, with a warning from the EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier that a transition period for the UK to smooth the exit from the bloc is at risk.

The i leads with the Treasury sanctioning Theresa May’s wish to see tuition fees cut.

The Independent writes that the capture of Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh has led to further operations against Islamic State targets in Syria.

The Daily Mail questions whether Kotey, who was captured in Syria, was on his way back to the UK to “bring bloodshed to the streets”.

The Sun carries a report on ex-Liverpool footballer Jermaine Pennant’s off-field activities.

The Daily Mirror runs with a story about James Yates, who was jailed for his part in the murder of Rhys Jones, getting released on parole.

Danny Dyer’s daughter Dani leads the Daily Star, with the Eastenders star saying he will “do over” anyone who makes a move on her.

Finally, the Daily Express runs with comments from deputy governor of the Bank of England Ben Broadbent who said financial systems will be “robust” regardless of the outcome of Brexit negotiations.

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